ABC’s for Your New School Year

It’s time for school to start! 
Parents and children look excitedly to the beginning of a new school year. Lists are made, curricula is purchased, and schedules are written.
If you are just starting the journey into homeschooling or are preparing for another homeschooling year, may these ABC’s for Your New School Year be a help and encouragement to you.
  1. Appreciate the opportunity to teach your children. Begin each day with thanksgiving to God asking for His guidance and blessing.

  2. Begin with the basics. Reading, writing, and arithmetic are fundamental. Focus on these subjects first thing each day. That way if you have an interruption, the fundamentals have hopefully been covered.

  3. Celebrate each child’s victory over a difficult assignment with a word of affirmation.

  4. Declutter throughout the day. Put away items as you finish with them so that you are not overwhelmed at the end of the day with clutter.
    Manipulatives make learning fun.
    Manipulatives make learning fun. However, they can create clutter if not returned to their proper storage containers.

  5. Establish a routine but don’t be ruled by it. If a learning opportunity arises that will be beneficial for your children, then take advantage of it.

  6. Fortify the foundation. Review a few minutes every day. For example, drill math facts every day.

  7. Gather all needed materials for the next week before it arrives. For those who struggle with this, collect some small storage boxes and label each as one subject. Put all materials for that subject in that storage box. This will save you time and freedom from frustration.
    Make sure you have gathered all the materials you will need to teach your lesson before you begin your presentation.
    Make sure you have gathered all the materials you will need to teach your lesson before you begin your lesson presentation.

  8. Have a wish list of needed items for grandparents or others who wish to purchase gifts for special occasions. What child wouldn’t like a microscope, telescope, or gem collection?

  9. Instill in children the desire to read. Set aside a specific time each day when children may read a parent-approved book of their choice. Younger children can look at picture books. This also gives you time to read or unwind.

  10. Journal your homeschooling accomplishments each day. On days when you feel like you are getting nowhere, pick up your journal and see how far you’ve come. It will encourage you.

  11. Keep a list of helpful resources. It may be librarians, internet addresses, professionals, wildlife officers, support group leaders, etc. Don’t be afraid to ask questions when you need help.

  12. Launch the new year with a special learning activity, field trip related to the first few lessons, or a New Year’s School Party. It may be just decorating notebooks or pencil boxes. Make it a memorable day.

  13. Mishaps will happen. Mistakes will be made. Maintain your testimony during these times. Don’t be shocked when they happen. Just pick up the pieces and start over. Life’s lessons can sometimes teach what we cannot. Learn from the mistakes and adjust as needed. Misplaced items will eventually be found.

  14. Network with other homeschooling parents. Share bits of wisdom and encouragement.

  15. Outline your objectives for the year in each subject. Keep the list before you each day to help you stay focused and not be led away by activities that do not support your school year.

  16. Prevent burnout with proper breaks, but keep progressing productively. Periodically check each child’s performance and adjust schooling as needed.

  17. Quiz orally and give children ample time to answer. Have older students defend their answers with facts.

  18. Revise curricula as needed. If a lesson plan needs to be retaught, do so. Try different ways to present a lesson.

  19. State simply what is expected from each lesson each day. Children need to know what is important.

  20. Tape recorders are great helpers. Children can use them to help with vocabulary drill, math drills, practicing oral communication, etc. Older children can record stories for younger children to listen to while you are teaching older ones.

  21. Utilize time wisely. Schedule your day. Be creative with chores and naptimes.

  22. Variety is the spice of life. Vary the way lessons are presented. Lecturing every day will bring learning to a standstill.

  23. Wake up to a new day and know that it is another opportunity to instill in your children what you wish for them to learn. Wisdom goes far beyond simple understanding.

  24. Expect your children to learn. Examinations are part of life. Test their skills.

  25. Yah is an informal word for yes. Yes, you can do this. Just remember that you are learning to discipline yourself just as you are teaching your children to discipline themselves. Yield to God’s leadership in this area.

  26. Zeal is required to finish any race. The course that you are on requires patience and devotion. Be committed to cross the finish line.

    I hope these ABC’s for Your New School Year have been helpful and encouraging. May your homeschooling journey be the great adventure into learning that it is meant to be.

 


Does your family have a special activity for beginning the new school year?
Do you have any helpful ideas for those beginning their first year of homeschooling?

©2017 by Peggy Clark

 

Finding Strength in God Alone

The Man Who Found Strength in His Weakness

I love to see horses galloping across a mountain ridge, muscles bulging, nostrils exhaling steam in the crisp air. What a picture of strength and power to anyone who views such a sight.

Mankind has depended upon the strength of the horse to defeat his enemy in battle, but it is a strength upon which we are commanded not to depend. The strength that we must depend upon can only come from the Source of All Strength who desires to bestow us with power that confounds the unbelieving onlooker and draws their attention to Almighty God.

The horse is a symbol of strength.
The horse is a symbol of strength. (Photo from Pixabay.)

We each have leaned upon our horses of money, family, friends, and societal status. Our experiences have taught us, however, that these horses will not sustain us.

The Bible tells us about a man named Paul who leaned upon his horse of religious pride. He was a Pharisee of Pharisees, a Hebrew of the Hebrews, and considered himself blameless concerning the law. Some might say he was a bully who used the law to hide his own weaknesses.

Paul’s intention was to destroy the followers of Jesus. Yet he was brought to his face in the dirt on a road to Damascus. The brilliance of God’s presence stripped him to the foundation of his religious beliefs. The walls of his resistance were broken down by a voice from heaven, “[I]t is hard for thee to kick against the pricks” (Acts 9:5). Left blinded, Paul’s companions led him by the hand into Damascus where he was left on Straight Street. When the dust settled, three days had passed before he finally regained any sight.

It was there on Straight Street where the Master Architect in Heaven began to reveal His plans for Paul’s life. Through the disciple, Ananias, God began laying a new foundation that would enable Paul to truly know Christ and the power of His resurrection.

Following God’s instructions, Ananias lay his hands upon Paul speaking words that opened the windows of Paul’s understanding. His life’s calling was revealed to him. He would be God’s witness to all men, experiencing great things “for Christ’s sake” (2 Corinthians 12:10).

Paul’s experiences “for Christ’s sake” soon revealed a path that would take him through mental, physical, and emotional suffering. Having a weak body and contemptible speech, his horse of self-sufficiency toppled. Seeking deliverance from his weaknesses, God’s words of wisdom came to him, “My grace is sufficient for thee: for my strength is made perfect in weakness” (2 Corinthians 12:9).

Humbled to submission, Paul realized that he could do nothing without the indwelling power of Christ. He became thankful for his weaknesses because those weaknesses revealed Christ’s strength at work through him.  In fact, his weaknesses became the tools that God used to make his ministry powerful.

“Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses for Christ’s sake: for when I am weak, then am I strong” (2 Corinthians 12:10).

(Photo from Pixabay.)
(Photo from Pixabay.)

What transformation must take place before we can truly become strong? With Paul, this transformation began with prayer, “Lord, what wilt thou have me to do?” (Acts 9:6).

God gave Paul a simple instruction, “Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do.”  Paul obeyed and was led to the city of Damascus, and there the cracks in his foundation were replaced with the solid foundation that enabled him to truly stand for Christ.

As Paul yielded to God’s plan, his life was transformed. He found that he could do all things through Christ who strengthened him. The horses that he had previously depended upon were laid aside.

                “And I was with you in weakness, and in fear, and in much trembling. And my speech and my preaching was not with enticing words of man’s wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power: That your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men, but in the power of God” (1 Corinthians 2:3–5).

Many are the stories that one could tell of those who “out of weakness were made strong” (Hebrews 11:34).  Weakness is the catapult that drives us to God’s presence. It is the horse that bucks us into the arms of God’s abounding grace that is given to us as we submit to its transforming power to conform us to the image of Christ. We learn to embrace this misunderstood friend as we lay ourselves prostrate before a holy God and wait for His empowerment from on high.

Circumstances of life may have left us in difficult places. Yet as we yield to God’s transforming power, we will discover that He can make our lives fruitful regardless of any handicaps or weaknesses that hinder us.  Emptied of our own strength, we must acknowledge that the horses of this world cannot empower us. We must then choose to embrace the Source of All Strength, our Almighty God, who enables us to do all things through Christ.

My prayer for you today is that you will focus not upon your weaknesses but upon the One who can accomplish great feats through you that will confound unbelievers and draw them into the arms of the true Source of All Strength. When you feel weak and defeated may the following verse be an encouragement to you. It has helped me tremendously when my weaknesses have tried to overwhelm me.

“And God is able to make all grace abound toward [me]; that [I], always having all sufficiency in all things, may abound to every good work” (2 Corinthians 9:8).

Prayer

Dear Father in Heaven, I realize I have no strength of my own. I confess that I have depended upon the horses of this world and they have failed me. I now lay them aside and embrace You as the Source of All Strength. I yield to Your transforming power. Enable me to fulfill Your purpose and follow Your plan for my life. Thank you for Your indwelling presence that will make my life fruitful and will empower me to do Your will through Christ my Saviour. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Questions

  1. In what ways do we allow our weaknesses/handicaps to hinder us from doing God’s will?
  2. How is God’s strength perfected in us?
  3. What horses have I personally leaned upon to strengthen me instead of leaning upon the strength that only God can give me?

All Scripture quotations above are taken from the King James Version of the Bible.

©2017 by Peggy Clark

Model Teaching: Lesson Presentation

Model Teaching: A Simplified Approach to Lesson Presentation

Prepared to teach but not sure how to present the material?

Relax.  Here’s 4 steps you can follow and be successful.

You’ve gathered the needed materials. You’ve prepared your lesson. But now you must TEACH the lesson.

Make sure you have gathered all the materials you will need to teach your lesson before you begin your presentation.
Make sure you have gathered all the materials you will need to teach your lesson before you begin your presentation.
You know what you want your children/students to learn, but how do you present it?

Yes, there are many ways to present lesson material, but following these simple steps will help you become confident until you feel comfortable varying your teaching strategy. This simplified approach will also enhance the learning of your students.

Don’t let first year jitters keep you from moving forward with your plans.  Just follow these 4 steps and you will be successful.

4 Steps to Successfully Present Any Lesson

Step 1:  Ask the students what they already know about the subject material to be presented. Allow them to share their knowledge for a limited time.
Step 2:  Present the lesson.  Be sure to define any new vocabulary and include discussion of terms within the material.
Step 3:  Carefully guide students to discover the main idea, plot, principle, or conclusion.
Step 4:  Finally, students should be able to clearly explain the main idea, plot, principle, or conclusion in their own words and be able to defend their position and/or reasoning. They should be able to paraphrase the material presented, retell the story, or restate the main facts.

Continue to follow these 4 steps, and you will build confidence in yourself as a teacher.  An extra benefit is that your students’ retention is greatly enhanced.

I hope this simplified approach to lesson presentation has been helpful.

Have a successful year teaching.

©2017 by Peggy Clark

 

 

 

 

Ephesians 6:15

Are Your Feet Shod Properly?

And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace. Ephesians 6:15

When I reminisce on the word shod I picture a rancher shoeing a horse. He carefully shapes each shoe and attaches each one to fit the horse’s hooves.  They must be a perfect fit or they won’t protect properly.

The rancher knows that his horses need shoes to protect their hooves or they will not be able to do the work that he needs them to do.  A limping horse is of no value to the rancher.

Recently my husband and I stopped at a shoe store. My husband wanted me to have a new pair of sandals. Thankfully, I found a pair that was comfortable.

The sales clerk placed them in a box and kept them safe at the counter while we continued to look. There were several pairs that we liked, but they did not fit the bottom of my feet properly.  Not finding another pair we made our purchase and left.

Arriving home, the package was placed in the bedroom to be opened later. I will probably not open the package until I need the shoes inside.

These sandals can be adjusted to one’s feet.

We are to prepare ourselves by shodding our feet.

I’m afraid that’s also what we do with our Bibles. We bring them home and place them on the end table or some other location to be opened later.

It’s not that we think the Bible is of no importance. It certainly is. But just as the rancher prepares his horse for the work he has to do, we are to prepare ourselves for the work God has us to do.

To shod myself I must put forth the effort to put on my shoes.

For the sandals that I purchased to be of any value to me, I must take them out of the package and put them on my feet. I must shod myself with my shoes to protect my feet from stones and other debris that would cause harm. I do not wish to endure the pain of a stumped toe or jagged cut.

As my physical feet are shod with sandals so my spiritual feet are shod with God’s Word.

Just as the rancher prepares his horse’s hooves to be fitted with shoes, I must prepare myself to be fitted with the gospel of peace.

To shod myself with the gospel of peace I must open the Bible and absorb its words. As I shod myself with God’s Word, I am being provided with the protection that I need to walk through the debris of life.

A turn onto the wrong path can leave me limping through life. Instead, I want to walk through God’s fields with a healthy and Christ-honoring stride.

Preparing ourselves with the gospel of peace will keep us from limping in God’s fields.

Wherefore take unto you the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all to stand.

Stand therefore, having your loins girt about with truth, and having on the breastplate of righteousness;

And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace;

Above all, taking the shield of faith, wherewith ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked. Ephesians 6:13-16

 

 

Story Starters

Needing some inspiration for writing a short story?

Does writing the first sentence give you pause?

Hopefully, these story starters will help you get past Writer’s Block and on to Story Street.

 

The night breathed heavily; its sweaty …

Sam crawled under the covers hiding his face from the …

The sun peeped over the mountains just as ….

Suitcases packed, she breathed her last goodbye …

Violin music floated through the air…

A sudden crash startled John …

Fire burned through Jesse’s shoulder knocking him to the ground …

Love was not a thing to be tangled with …

Papa stood at the door looking out over the fields of cotton …

Mary was just a child when …

“Cancer,” the doctor spoke the word as if it was just a cold or the flu …

They weren’t just any ordinary pair of shoes…

There she stood looking through the window…

I hadn’t meant for it to take this long…

The year ended, but still I had no answer…

I hope these story starters have inspired you to write your short story.

Writing Without Fear of the Red Pen

The Fear of the Red Pen

Writing is a joy for some, but a terror to others.

What makes one person enjoy the process while others are terrified by it?

Some would-be authors find themselves constrained by the how-to’s, structural rules and regulations bought upon by well-meaning teachers who choose to use the red pen more than they ought.

It’s not that the red pen isn’t necessary, it’s just that grammar and punctuation isn’t all that writing is.

Put the fear of the red pen away and enjoy the writing process.
Put the fear of the red pen away and enjoy the writing process.

Writing is the thought, the intent, the emotion, the mental anguish, the imagination unleashed.

When used too early, the red pen is perceived as an attack against the soul.

It is what is feared, that somehow one is incapable of expressing themselves properly. The red pen is sometimes received as an acknowledgement of the fear of failure that resides within ourselves.

So, put aside the red pen until later.

Expressions should be allowed in the first stages of the writing process.

Plotting, outlining, summarizing, etc., these terms can be scary to someone who just wants the freedom to write.

So, in the beginning stages why not just write.

Let your thoughts flow.

Allow yourself to make mistakes, but get your expressions out. You might find some great ideas in those lines you have penned or typed.

Next take those ideas and expound on them.

Visualize your characters, know their hardships and fears, know them intimately.

Surround those characters with settings that magnify their problems or at least don’t interfere with the progression of the story.

Make the setting fit the story line.

Accidents on curvy mountain roads, falls from rocky cliffs, heart attacks on hiking trails, broken hearts in movie theaters, loneliness at the school dance…

Insert lively characters that fit the setting.

We expect cowboys in Texas or Australia, businessmen in suits on Wall Street, bankers in Switzerland, skiers in Colorado or the Alps, fishermen off Nova Scotia. We know and are familiar with housewives in suburbia, school teachers in rural areas, and farmers on the Midwestern plains.

Writing, authoring, scribbling, or whatever you may call it, is just expressing your imagination on paper.

Let your imagination run wild. Sci-fi, fantasy, romance.  You can pretend to be anywhere at any time.

Today, yesterday, or tomorrow…There is no limitation to time on the written pages of your mind.

Share your thoughts, share your dreams, share your fears. Hide behind your pseudonym, your pen name, your ghost writer, or whoever.

Your words become forces that confront the reality of existence.

Keep the story moving forward.

You are an author. Your words may not be written down in a best-selling novel, but they are your words in action. Just be sure your words do not kill your onward progression to what lies ahead. Make them positive words that encourage, instill, and infuse joy, excitement, and contentment.

Make your words lively to the reader. Keep them searching for the next word on the next trail of pages. The red pen can come later.


Do you find yourself fearing the red pen?

Don’t be afraid to have your writing critiqued. Share it with several people who will honestly respond to what you have written. Consider their comments.

Remember that you are the author. You can choose to accept or reject their recommendations. But if you are wise, you will learn from the critiquing experience and your writing will improve.

Proofreading for grammar and punctuation is in the last stages of the writing process. That’s when you can appreciate the red pen.

What are your fears in the writing process?
What is keeping you from becoming the next best-selling author?

ABC’s of Finalizing Your School Year

Finishing Your School Year Successfully

The time comes when the school year must end and the next begin.

Whether you school on a nine-month, year-round, or quarterly schedule, there are items that all administrators must do to finalize the school year.

If you are winding up your home school year, may these ABC’s of Finalizing Your School Year guide you to a successful finish.

ABC's to Finishing Your School Year

ABC’s to a Successful Finish

 

A — Assess your school year. Note your children’s accomplishments. Accept what you did not accomplish and adjust plans for the following year accordingly.

B — Brainstorm ideas for the following year.

Broaden your vision by attending homeschooling conferences, teacher’s conferences, writer’s conferences, and support group workshops.

C —Clarify your goals for each child for the next year.

Create new folders for each and make comments to remind yourself of why you chose those goals. Those goals can be changed later, but your comments will help you as you plan for the next year.

D — Dedicate a small portion of each day during your school break to plan for the next year so that you will not be overwhelmed as the new year draws closer. This time should be devoted to research curricula, gather needed materials, make plans for field trips, and develop lesson plans.

E — Enjoy your school break by exploring the environment with your children. Engage in meaningful activities that will peak children’s curiosities and enrich their learning experiences.

F — Finalize and fax or mail required forms with your state’s Department of Non-public Instruction. Keep your own file copies of these forms for future reference.

G — Gift graduates.

If your own child is graduating, host a great graduation reception.

H — Have a holiday and relax. Take some much-needed time for yourself.

I — Invest in storage containers for children’s assignments that you wish to keep.

J — Join online homeschooling groups/blogs to stay encouraged.

K — Keep a journal of summer activities

L — Lobby legislators during your break from teaching. Let them know of any concerns you have concerning home school legislation.

M — Make final reports of grades for the year.

Even if you do not issue official report cards, your children still need to have that feeling of having passed to the next level. Give a report card, certificate, or statement of completion for the school year.

N — Notify family members and acquaintances of school year accomplishments, graduation dates, or other pertinent information you wish to share.

Nominate your children for scholarships to academic camps that may be of benefit to them.

O — Own up to any failures during the past year. Make a commitment to yourself to avoid those failures next year.

P — Persevere to the end. Prevent burnout but stay productive.

Praise progress and promise something special when all lessons have been completed. Follow through with that promise.

Q — Quiz your children. Develop a questionnaire that allows your children to critique their school year. Make it simple. There are no right or wrong answers. Let your children be honest with you.

What did they like most about the school year?

What was their favorite lesson/project?

What did they find most difficult?

What would they change if they could?

Ask a variety of simple questions. Use the answers to critique your teaching style versus their learning styles. You may be surprised at their answers. What may have been most difficult for you may have been most enjoyable for them.

R — Revise your schedule. Don’t just fill in lessons to fill up time.

If your children are through with lessons for the year in a certain subject, then utilize that time for completing your records, putting away unnecessary resources, and finishing other end of year projects.

Check registration due dates for graduates furthering their education through college or vocational schools.

S — Smile a lot. Don’t allow yourself to get stressed out with end of year tests or to start rushing through lessons to get done by a designated date. If your projected end date needs to be adjusted, do so.

Don’t let pressures ruin your testimony before your children. Be as excited about ending as you are about beginning. Success is not measured merely by pages completed.

T — Transcripts should be completed. This is an important record of each student’s accomplishments especially during the high school years.

U — Unexpected interruptions seem to be more frequent during this time of year. Plan your response before they happen.

Some interruptions may be valuable opportunities, but weigh each carefully before you change your schedule. Are they worth extending your school year?

V — Vary your teaching style. As subjects taper off, use the extra time to add variety to the rest of your lesson plans.

W — Welcome the school/summer break with a well-deserved end-of-year party.

X — Exalt your children for jobs well-done. Recognize achievements and victories from the school year. It is okay to give your child a certificate of completion, a certificate of victory over some difficulty they experienced, or a certificate of accomplishment such as learning cursive.

Y — Yesterday is gone. It is in the yearbook of life. Don’t beat yourself up over it, but learn from it. What do you wish to do better next year? Write it in a simple statement and place it on the first page of next year’s school planner.

Z — Zip up the pencil cases and notebooks and enjoy time away from the kitchen table.

Zoom to the zoo. Zoom to the beach or to any other of your favorite getaways.


I hope these ABC’s for finalizing your school year have been helpful.
What other activities are necessary to finalize your school year?
Does your family have a special end of year activity?

 

Purpose in Life

 Purpose Gives Life Meaning

Abandoned Fawn Finds a New Friend Photo
An abandoned fawn finds a much-needed friend.

 

 

Life is short.

Not that anyone notices.

However, a quick trip through any graveyard will reveal the various ages when people die.

Young or old, death is no respecter of persons.

My family realized this when my five-year-old daughter’s best friend died in a freak accident.

Yes, even five-year-olds die.

I realized it as a young person when several friends of mine died needlessly.

I also realized it as an adult when my father died in his fifties. Since then I have realized it when my grandmothers and grandfather died. (My other grandfather died before I was born.)

Since life is so short, of what should it consist?

What makes life truly worth living?

And if life has any value, what value should we give it?

Purpose gives meaning to life.

It is our purpose on this earth that gives us value.  A man or woman without purpose has little life for which to live.

What is it that gives us the desire to live?

Waterwheels remain to remind us of days gone by when their purpose was to turn gears for machinery.
Waterwheels remain to remind us of days gone by when their purpose was to turn gears for machinery.

I remember my father’s words.

My father had said that he would never have heart surgery again. This was before all the modern advances that reduced the surgical procedure’s invasiveness.

However, the time came when he spoke of heart surgery again. I told him I thought he would never have surgery again.

He replied, “When it comes to dying, a man will do anything to live.”

Those words stuck in my mind.

People tell me they wouldn’t want to be in such and such a condition and would want to die instead.

It is then that I remember the words of my father and realize that people do not know what they will desire until they face death themselves. It is then that life takes on added meaning.

Once upon a time this building owner's purpose was to entertain people. The building itself now needs a renewed purpose.
Once upon a time this building owner’s purpose was to entertain people. The building itself now needs a renewed purpose.

The desire to live gives purpose to life.

It is the desire to live that gives new purpose to life even though the focus changes when we must face death ourselves.

Then the time has come to heal old wounds, make the apologies we should have made long ago, tell our loved ones how much we love them, and reach out to others with the compassion we never had before.

Yes, life has value down to the end of our last breath.

Every word has purpose.

Even our last words have purpose. They set a pattern for the future of our families.

Our last words can leave our loved ones with a blessing or a curse.

Jacob blessed his children before he climbed back into bed and gave up the ghost (Genesis 49).

David blessed Solomon and gave him wise counsel that directed the future of the kingdom of Israel (1 Kings 2).

Jesus blessed the disciple John and gave him the responsibility of caring for Jesus’ earthly mother (John 19:26-27).

Our lives affect the future.

Our lives affect the future of others.

Soldiers are willing to die on the battlefield because they want their families to have a future.

The men at the Alamo gave their lives so Texas would one day be free from Mexican rule.

Shammah stood in the middle of a bean patch and fought against the enemy so his people would have food (2 Samuel 23:11-12).

Jesus gave His life on a cross so that all people could have a future and a hope. His last words as recorded in Luke 24:46-49 gave his disciples understanding and future direction for their lives.

Markers are placed to remember a grave even though the name of the remains may have been long forgotten.
Markers are placed to remember a grave even though the name of the remains may have been long forgotten.

Our life’s purpose gives meaning to life.

Whether we understand our value or not, others need us to fulfill our purpose.

Fulfilling our purpose will give meaning to our lives.

An orphaned opossum is cared for by a concerned caregiver.
An orphaned opossum is cared for by a concerned caregiver.

Copyright 2017 by authorpeggyclark.com


 

 

 

Mother Seeking Proverbs 31 Woman

The Proverbs 31 Woman

A Mother’s Lesson Plan

“Who can find a virtuous woman? for her price is far above rubies.” Proverbs 31:10

King Lemuel’s mother gave her son valuable lessons concerning the pitfalls into which any son can fall prey.  She was highly concerned that he be guided properly, so she bore this role personally.

A virtuous woman is a source of strength for her husband.
A virtuous woman is a source of strength for her husband.

 Two important areas she discussed in her lesson plans were women and strong drink.

This mother knew that if her son did not conduct himself properly in these two areas, his authority over his kingdom would be damaged and his judgment thwarted.

To protect his future kingship, she wisely advised him:

“Give not thy strength unto women, nor thy ways to that which destroyeth kings.

It is not for kings, O Lemuel, it is not for kings to drink wine; nor for princes strong drink.” Proverbs 31:3-4

Her plans included two important words.

The list of attributes describing the virtuous woman that this mother desired for her son may seem challenging to today’s woman but are basically contained in two words which this mother used to teach an important lesson to her son.

The first is ‘ruby’ and the second is ‘heart’.

Lemuel’s mother wanted to instill in Lemuel the value of a good woman. To do this, she placed the image of a ruby in his mind.

As a man in training for kingship, young Lemuel would be taught the value of gems and their use in commerce.

Precious stones were given by visiting royalty as presents unto kings. Lemuel had to be able to distinguish quality between the various stones presented.

Why did this mother choose the ruby to educate her son in these matters?
What qualities does a ruby possess that would describe a virtuous woman?

Large transparent rubies are rarer than diamonds. Thus, the value of a natural, transparent ruby is more than that of a diamond.

Obviously, this mother realized that a virtuous woman would be someone for whom Lemuel would have to diligently seek. A virtuous woman was not a common commodity.

The more transparent a ruby is the greater the value. Although all rubies have some flaws, the less imperfections a ruby has, the more it is desired.

When a woman is transparent, she has nothing to hide. She allows her husband to see her as she is. She does not try to put a veil over his eyes as to her character.

A ruby can be heat treated to remove some internal flaws.

Trials and afflictions are the fires that God uses to purify man. A virtuous woman can endure those trials and afflictions and remain true.

It takes an expert to distinguish between a natural and a man-made ruby.

God is the expert that can discern a woman’s heart and her motives. A wise man will seek God’s will when contemplating courtship. His eyes cannot see into a woman’s heart, but God’s eyes can.

“The heart of her husband doth safely trust in her, so that he shall have no need of spoil.

She will do him good and not evil all the days of her life.” Proverbs 31:11-12

The second word that King Lemuel’s mother focused upon was heart.

Men consider trust a major factor in describing a healthy marriage.

If a man feels he cannot confide in his wife, if he feels she has betrayed his confidences, he will stop entrusting her with his words. This may lead him to seek spoil or an unscriptural relationship with another.

Many marriages end because another woman chose to listen to a married man’s words and keep them in confidence, thus drawing the man away from his wife.

The advice that King Lemuel’s mother gave was directed in such a way that King Lemuel would be able to understand the consequences of unwise choices.  She turned his focus upon his own heart and how it would be affected by those choices.

The choice that he would make as to a wife would do him good or do him evil all the days of his life.

He could choose that which was more valuable than rubies in which he could safely invest his heart and profit, or he could choose that which was of less value and loose his investment and suffer loss.

"A virtuous woman is a crown to her husband." Proverbs 12:4
“A virtuous woman is a crown to her husband.” Proverbs 12:4

“Who can find a virtuous woman?”

She is described as transparent and trustworthy.

She reflects what is inside of her, the character of Christ. She is a haven for her husband and keeps his words close to herself.

Her motives are pure, showing her intent to protect her husband’s heart.  Therefore, she is given the liberty to accomplish all that the Proverbs 31 woman had liberty to accomplish.

The virtuous Proverbs 31 woman could involve herself in such activities as described in Proverbs 31:13-24 because she could be trusted to do those things without bringing shame to her husband or her household.

The Proverbs 31 woman was portrayed, not by her performance, but by the transparency of her true nature.

King Lemuel was taught to ask himself two important questions as he sought for a wife.

Does this woman’s transparency or lack thereof reveal Christlike character or a flawed character?
Does this woman’s transparency or lack thereof reveal a trustworthy heart or a questionable one?

King Lemuel’s adopted course of action hopefully brought him a Proverbs 31 woman that he safely trusted in all his days.

©2016 authorpeggyclark.com


Join in the conversation. Leave your comment below.
  • The Proverbs 31 woman is usually described by what she does.
  • Do you define the Proverbs 31 woman by her performance?
  • If measuring performance, how do you measure up?
  • According to Proverbs 31:30, what woman is to be praised?
  • Did the Proverbs 31 woman’s performance define her relationship with God or did her relationship with God define her performance?
  • How does your above answer correspond with Ephesians 2:8-10?

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Potter’s ‘Brand’

Every Potter’s Work Is Unique

I met a new potter this weekend while taking pictures at an event I attended. Since I love pottery, we struck up a conversation and “friended” each other. Her work was beautiful, especially the various mugs and trays that she had on display.

Although there are several potters who work in my area, each potter’s work is unique.

Potters brand their pieces with special markings.
Potters brand their pieces with special markings.

Every Potter Eventually Establishes a ‘Brand’

Not only are their individual items uniquely made, but the colors used and patterns applied are unique to each potter.

You might say they each have their ‘brand’.  That brand is established by their unique styles.

That style is brought out by hands that carefully mold and form from the potter’s viewpoint and vision.

Sometimes the clay wishes to cooperate with the potter. Sometimes it does not. The potter patiently places the clay back on the wheel until finally the clay submits to the potter’s wishes.

Potters use a variety of colors and markings.
Potters use a variety of colors and markings.

The Potter Knows the Potential of the Clay

It’s not that the potter doesn’t consider the clay’s texture or color or strength. The potter knows those things. But the potter also knows what the clay can become when it yields itself to his or her touch.

The potter has the end piece in view.

He or she sees it in all its beautiful form as finished and sitting on a customer’s table. He or she knows its usefulness and the blessing it will be as it pours out its contents to those who sit at the table.

Different sizes of pitchers for a variety of uses.
Potters make pitchers in a variety of sizes for different uses.

Our Master in Heaven Is

the Great Potter

It’s the same way with our Master in Heaven. He is the Great Potter who forms us and molds us to be the vessels that will bless those for whom we are poured out in service for Him.

Our Great Potter knows our frame, but He sees what we can be. He sees us as what we will be in His kingdom.

He is the author and finisher of our faith. One day our faith will end in sight.

One day soon we will see our Great Potter face to face. May He say of us in that day, “Well done!”

Copyright©2017 by Peggy Clark

Photos © by Peggy Clark

Peggy Clark is the author of So, What's the Latest News? Messages from a Prisoner in Rome, available from WestBow Press, a division of Thomas Nelson & Zondervan. Check out her blog at http://sowhatsthelatestnews.info.